Curriculum (in 2017)

CURRICULUM

Core courses (required)

1.

2.

3.

4.

Credits

Semester

Total number of lessons

1. Research Methodology  (Anikó Khademi-Vidra)

30

 

 

 

9

2. Regional Economics (Krisztián Ritter)

30

 

 

 

9

3. Theory and Practice of Regional Planning (Tibor Tiner)

 

30

 

 

9

4. Economic and Settlement History Processes in Europe (Lajos Rácz)

 

 

30

 

 

5. Regional Development and Public Administration: European Models ( Zoltán Hajdú)

 

30

 

 

9

6. Population Flow (Mária Rédei)

 

 

30

 

9

Total number of compulsory credits

 

 

 

 

54

 

Compulsory elective courses

(choose 2 courses)

 

1.Introduction to Regional Science (Anikó Khademi-Vidra)

30

 

 

 

4

2. Settlement Network in Europe (Melinda Molnar)

 

 

 

30

 

3. The Social Aspects of Rural Development Policy in the EU (Tibor Farkas)

 

 

30

 

4

 

5. The regional issues of education (Anikó Khademi-Vidra)

 

 

30

 

4

7. Consumer Behavior (Anikó Khademi-Vidra)

 

 

 

30

4

8. City Marketing (Melinda Molnár)

 

 

30

 

4

 

9. Agricultural Economics (László Vasa)

 

 

30

 

4

10. Short Food Supply Chains (Anikó Juhász)

 

 

30

 

4

11. Regional and Local Economic Development (Henrietta Nagy)

 

 

 

30

4

12. E-government (István Tózsa)

 

 

 

30

4

13. Destination Marketing and Management (Lóránt Dávid)

 

 

 

30

4

14. Tourism Management (Gábor Michalkó)

 

 

30

 

4

15. Environmental Policy, and Sustainable Development (László G. Tóth)

 

 

 

30

4

 

16. Spatial network analysis (György Jóna)

30

 

 

 

 

17. Techniques for writing a tender (György Jóna)

 

 

30

 

 

Total minimum number of compulsory credits

 

 

 

 

8

             

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Elective courses and their instructors-in-charge (choose 2 courses)

 

Course

Instructor-in-charge

Credits

1. EU Policy for Gender Equality

Timár Judit

4

2. Planning in Regional Development

Péti Márton

4

3. Gender Geography

Tímár Judit

4

4. Spatial Correlations of Social Processes

Kovács Katalin

4

5. Logistical Processes

Benkő János

4

6. Discrete Event Simulation

Benkő János

4

7. International and Regional Institutions for Development

Csáki György

4

8. Social and Spatial Disparities in Health Care

Orosz Éva

4

9. Spaces of Trade and Consumption

Nagy Erika

4

10. The System of the EU’s Cohesion Policy

Nagy Henrietta

4

11. Political Geography of the New Europe

Doris Wastl-Walter

4

 

 

The Curriculum of the Doctoral School consists of a triple structure based on the core courses for all doctoral students completed with the compulsory elective courses completed with elective courses. The number of optional course units can be increased by the fulfilment of the courses at other doctoral schools in accordance with the research topic of the Student. The Student can also choose from the subjects for other topic groups in case he/she informs the Head or the Secretary of the Doctoral school in advance. In case the relevant Student did not pursue his/her studies at the Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences involving the Doctoral School he/she can take subjects also taught there. In the event of courses fulfilled abroad the approval of the course shall be made by the Committee of the Doctoral School on the basis of the declaration of the instructor-in-charge stated in the Curriculum of the Doctoral School. The instructor-in-charge shall make the description of the course along with the schedule for both full-time and part-time students as a base for the students’ time management.

 

The instructor-in-charge is expected to apply the so-called team-like form of education and to teach the more important parts of the courses inviting renowned teachers of other universities as it can mean the beginning of a co-operation among doctoral schools.

 

The descriptions of courses of the Doctoral School are involved in the Curriculum of the Doctoral School of Regional Sciences. The procedure of doctoral studies is regulated in Appendix 8 of the Organizational and Operational Rules of the University.

 

  1. The Doctoral School- in accordance with the credit-based studies and exam codes of  doctoral schools- determines the study requirements as follows:

The doctoral program consists of 8 semesters and 240 credits shall be collected. The above mentioned 240 credits can be collected by the study units that are equivalent to the following work units:

Study unit A.: educational credit – minimum 70 credits, the maximum number of credits is not limited

I. study unit approved by the signature of the instructor and an exam mark

II. study unit completed with continuous supervision during the semester (tests, accounts, seminars for working up publications, etc)

 

III. study unit approved by a mid-term signature ( professional and research practice, fact-finding trips)

 

Study unit B: research credit– minimum 94 credit shall be collected, the maximum number of credits is not limited

IV. .directed research approved by a mid-term signature of the supervisor –minimum 50 credits, maximum 100 credits.

V. Scientific publication activity- minimum 44 credits, the maximum number of  credits is not limited.

 

Study unit C.: Teaching credit – the minimum number of credits is not limited, the maximum is 20 credits.

 

VI. Regular teaching work certified by the signature of the Dean/Head of  Department/Head of Institute/Head of Subject

 

 

For the approval of the semester at least 30 credits shall be collected (from A, B, C).  The assessment of the credits for the teaching and research activities of the Student shall be made –in each case, personalized- by the Supervisor and the Head of the Doctoral School together. The theoretical and/or practical course unit taught by the Student shall be certified by the Head of the relevant Institute.

Undefined